Tag: copyright protection

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

The Year in Review – Using eLearning and Moodle in a Small Business

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The needs of a small business are different from that of a big business, and different still from those of a university.  Unlike accounting and human resources, eLearning functionality has not been used in small business applications for very long.  Consequently, service providers, advice, and options are much harder to come by.  Even understanding how eLearning can work in your business might be difficult to envision.  

These posts from 2010 offer some ideas on how to use eLearning in general and Moodle specifically, in your small business.  They also provide some guidance on what to look for and what to avoid. 

My picks for best small business advice:

Here’s hoping for a safe and happy 2011. Happy New Year!

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Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Protecting your eLearning content – Is this something to worry about?

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I get a lot of questions about how to keep eLearning content safe from being copied, stolen, and/or plagiarized. My response is always “the only way to stop people from using your ideas is to keep them to yourself“. Both copyright and patent laws protect the owners of ideas, concepts, and designs from being copied outright in their original format. But you can’t stop someone from taking your ideas and making them better or combining them with the ideas of others for yet another way to look at things. Having others build on your ideas (and even copy some of them) is a true measure of how good your ideas really are.

Let’s be honest, how many of us have created some new process, program, or graphical layout that is totally from scratch? I haven’t. Everything I have ever taught, written, and/or created is a compilation of what I read in text books, what my teachers taught me, and what I’ve seen and otherwise experienced. What makes my training, coaching, and consulting valuable is ME. My training content is really an example of my skill as a teacher and subject matter expert. Yours should be, too.

Ask yourself:

  • Can anyone else do a better job teaching my content than I can?
  • Have I been able to capture everything I know on paper? Is that all there is to it?
  • Of all the text books, magazine articles, online copy, examples, etc., that I’ve ever written, read, or taught, how much of it was “stolen”? Isn’t it true that almost everything is built upon something else?

Throughout my 25 year consulting career, I watched in amazement as my training material – and that of my mentors and colleagues – showed up in the “work of others”, sometimes as part of very large training programs. Plagiarism is one thing; it’s illegal and unethical, but it’s hard to stop. When I was less wise than I am today, I was enraged by this. Then I realized that even though my chart might be in someone else’s course content, I was still the one getting the rave teacher reviews. “They were coming to see ME”.

The only thing you can do is to stay ahead of those who would steal your content to sell it as their own. While they’re peddling last month’s idea, you’re launching this month’s better idea. And you’re doing it better because you’re the one who can teach it best.

If you’re concerned about one person printing off your eLearning content and giving it to everyone else – thus cutting into your revenues, this can be easily prevented by making your online version worth spending the money on and harder than blazes to copy. Make people want the original recording…not a scratchy copy with background noise (metaphorically speaking). (Click here to read my previous post on what makes eLearning GREAT).

If you have the best jelly recipe on the planet, give away peanut butter to entice people to buy the jelly. Even better, give away the jelly recipe to prove that the real secret is the way it’s made! If you are a wonderful teacher with an effective way of teaching, let everyone know how good you are; let them know this content is yours and that if they want to learn more, they’ll have to come to YOU. Let others try to copy it! Michael Port gives away a book chapter to show people how good the book is. Williams-Sonoma gives away recipes (both in stores and online) to show how much they know about cooking (and to get you to buy the equipment). In The Martha Rules, Ms. Stewart tells readers to “Profit by giving information away”. These people are onto something…

If you want to teach something or you want to sell your ideas, you have to be willing to accept that “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”. [Charles Caleb Colton] However, no one is as good as the original – YOU. Spend your time, energy, and money making your content great and leave the worrying about theft to diamond dealers and fine art museums.

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