Oh, No! Not Another Slide Presentation!

January 24th, 2012
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When I was a child, slides were what your father used to bore the socks off family and visitors alike.  They were tiny little transparencies of the family vacation, which he presented with a slide projector (a carousel that held the little devils and frequently jammed), using a sheet hung on the wall as a screen.  He topped off the experience with an equally boring narrative of each not-so-captivating picture.

No, you’re not reading into things.  I chose my words carefully in the preceding paragraph and if you’re clever enough, you’ll get my hidden meaning.  Whether you do or not, I am begging you:

Stop thinking of training design in terms of slides!

Surely, at least some readers still remember “chalkboards” and “blackboards”.  How about “whiteboards” and “flip charts”?  In my youth, slides had nothing to do with teaching; Freelance and PowerPoint were not even ideas in someone’s brilliant mind at that time.  In my professional training career, I have used them as props, not the centerpiece of my courses.  I never, ever read the bullet points from a slide to my class.  I always paraphrased, adding my stories, my examples, my own words.  I moved around the room, I made funny faces, I waved my hands and stomped my feet.  I used other props, including toy airplanes and Styrofoam packing peanuts.

The idea of the unlimited potential of eLearning being reduced to online slides, with a one-sided narrative makes me very sad.  This was a boring and ineffective way to teach in person; it is even more so electronically.

I know it’s easy.  I know it’s rapid.  But easy and rapid are rarely used to describe something that is also great.

It seems I’m not alone in this thinking:

What?  You can’t afford to choreograph and video a dance troupe?  Even if you could, it wouldn’t be the best way to teach your subject?  That’s fine, but please don’t go running back to the slide presentation!

Now, I don’t mean to be disparaging of PowerPoint.  It’s a great program.  I’ve seen some fantastically animated presentations that I could barely tell were made with PowerPoint. Unfortunately, most of us are not terribly creative or even all that good with a computer. PowerPoint provides a “blank slate” which is great for people who know what to do with a blank sheet of paper.  For everyone else, it gives the false illusion that they’ve done something “professional”.  (Seriously, I saw that claim in a recent training course!) I have a copy of Photoshop but that does not make me a graphic designer.  Trust me, it doesn’t.

Please think in 3-D!

None of the authoring tools for eLearning content – or for business presentations, family vacation videos, or any other content you might want to share – can turn you into George Lucas.  But, they can make your presentation of any content more interesting, more compelling, and less “flat”.

Take this Prezi on Moodle by Tomaz Lasic, for instance:

Take advantage of all the options. Don’t pigeon-hole your content.

Prezi, like PowerPoint and Photoshop, is a great tool but it doesn’t magically turn a person into a creative genius.  What it does do is to provide a different blank slate, a new “dimension”, and a limitless screen similar to the physical classrooms of my youth. No matter what subject you teach, who your students are, or how “non-creative” you might feel, there are so many more options than slides sized to print on letter-paper. Prezi is just one option.  Dancing graduate students are another.  If you provide your instructional designer with good content and say “Go make this GREAT“, she’ll be able to do a lot more than if you say “Convert this to SCORM”. If you can’t afford an instructional designer, you can probably afford a starving art-school student.  Or, perhaps a starving music-school student can sing some of your audio.  Don’t just think outside the box.

Think outside the slide!

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How Much Do I Charge for Moodle Courses?

September 30th, 2011
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How much should I charge?  Let me pick something out of the air.Of all the questions I get when I’m consulting with a new or potential eLearning client, only one leaves me speechless:  “How much should I charge for my courses?”  That one question tells me that this person is not ready to embark on offering eLearning as a product or service.

Why?

  • In order to prepare a business case for your eLearning site, you need to know what courses in your subject area should sell for.
  • You have to know what price the market will bear before you can estimate revenues (and profits!).
  • To create a curriculum, you have to know how much content should be included in each course – this is the other side of the price coin.

Knowledge – and the transfer of it from one person to another – is not a commodity.  Learning is not something you pay for by the unit.  There is no such thing as a “standard charge per hour or page”.

To prove my point, I want you to go to the nearest university book store. Find three text books that are about the same size; one should be written by the world’s leading expert in that subject.  These books are likely to be – oh, I don’t know – $75, $150, maybe a lot more.  The one by the world’s leading expert is going to cost considerably more than the others.  Now, find a current bestselling novel that is about the same number of pages of your selected text books.  Chances are, it is somewhere between $15 and $25.

You’re not paying for the paper or the ink, or the time it takes you to read it.  The same is true when it comes to eLearning; people are not buying hours or pages.

If you’re reading this and thinking “uh-oh”, don’t despair!

Here’s what you should do:

  • Create a curriculum for your content, based on traditional training you’ve done, what others are doing, and/or your best judgment. This curriculum should contain:
    • Topic Categories (such as History/Math/Arts, Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced, or Young Children/Teenagers/Young Adults.)
    • Course Syllabi (outline, time, elapsed calendar time, objectives, prerequisites)
  • Get online and search for eLearning courses in your subject.
    • Do others have similar curricula?  If not, how do they differ?  Is this something you want to consider changing, or do you have a “better way”?
    • What are others charging for their courses?  If there is a large variation, can you tell why?  Is it their reputation?  Are they offering more personal attention or other extras?  What accounts for the price difference? Are they bundling courses or services?
  • Remember that your competitors are not just other online courses in this topic.  Your competition also includes online courses in other subjects, face-to-face courses in the same or similar topic, and even self-help videos (often free on YouTube!) and books.  The world is full of options. What are the alternatives to your online courses?  What are their costs and perceived value?
  • If you plan to offer CEUs, make sure your curriculum meets those requirements.

Once you know how much content will go into each course, who the audience will be, who will be paying for the courses, and what others are charging, you can begin to price your online courses.

The factors that go into pricing intellectual property (which your eLearning is) include (but are not limited to):

  • The reputation of the author/expert.
  • The complexity of the topic (and how good you are at explaining it, compared to your competitors).
  • The need to know the topic.
  • The desirability of the knowledge. How eager are people to know this?
  • The perceived value of the knowledge.  This can be high if students believe they will see a return on their investment in a short time, through better jobs, weight loss, improved quality of life, etc.
  • The ability of those who want to take the courses to pay the price.  To overcome the budget shortcomings of your otherwise-eager students, you can offer smaller chunks at lower prices, bundle courses for volume discounts, offer free services to go with paid courses, etc.

Once you have priced your courses, you definitely want to revisit your business case and make sure this is still a business you want to be in.

For more on the steps to launching eLearning as a new product or service, view the presentation in Using Moodle for Business: Moot Presentation.  Pricing is a critical component of the Business Case, Step 1.

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A Few Words About: Getting Help in Moodle

September 15th, 2011
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Last month I asked my Moodle host to upgrade BeeLearn.com to 2.1.  I’m getting antsy to overhaul my curriculum using the new features of Moodle.  It took him about two hours to complete the entire site upgrade, including the back-ups of the old site. Everything works swell, except for a couple of third-party modules that we knew wouldn’t work beyond Moodle 1.9x (not yet, anyway).

A few days earlier, I had set up my new desktop PC, with the latest of every version of software for every application you can imagine.  As of today, I am still trying to get to the same level of functionality I had before the upgrade.  Since I had the same computer, with the same version of the operating system and application software for five years, I had many customized settings.  I had grown accustomed to the location of tools and options.  Now, I can barely delete an email.

The thing is, when I have a question such as “how do I enable conditional activities in Moodle” I have four choices:

  1. Poke around until I figure it out myself
  2. Read through the online documentation (always easy to locate)
  3. Post a question at a forum and wait for a response from another user
  4. Ask a Moodle expert, such as my host (if I have engaged him for a support contract)

All of these options are reasonable, by my standards.  I typically receive helpful answers in a short period of time.  Option # 4 is the only one that costs anything and it is also the most reliable.

In the six years that I’ve been using Moodle, I’ve heard some folks express concern that since it is open source there’s really no one to respond to questions; no one is responsible to provide explanation of a feature or help troubleshoot a problem.  That seemed like a valid concern, if options 1-3 above were not feasible for certain people.  I get it. Not everyone has my curiosity or tenacity; maybe they are more interested in rock climbing than learning Moodle.  That’s cool, too.

Now I’m wondering how those people are coping.  When I clicked on the Help icon in my brand-spanking new desktop software (it doesn’t matter which application; they’re all the same), I was stunned, horrified, mortified (you get my point) to be taken to an online community forum and presented with literally hundreds of posts that were somewhat related to my keyword.

What happened to the help index?  Where is the comprehensive list of how to do whatever?  I’m fine with that process when the software is open source and I didn’t pay to download it.  But when the application costs $1000 and I have to accept legal terms to use it, I do not expect to receive support from some other user who happened to figure something out!

What this tells me is that open source software (such as Moodle) just took one more giant leap toward “the business model of the future”.  That one advantage of proprietary software – paying more for the product to ensure technical support – just went down the drain.

If you had any reservations about Moodle – or any other open source application – because of the “lack of support” – you can rest assured that you will get at least – and probably better – support from the enthusiastic Moodle community than you will from the reluctant and desperate users of those “other products”. Most Moodle Partners offer on-going support contracts (essentially, personal help forums) that are less money than the purchase price of my desktop suite that has no such support.

Note:  When you’re building your business case and determining your budget, be sure to include the costs of training and support for Moodle if you plan to do most of the build yourself. If you don’t have the time or desire to learn Moodle to that extent, include the costs of a course developer in your budget.  Actually, these costs are added on to any project, regardless of whether you use Moodle, other open source, or proprietary software.  None of them come out of the box with your content in them!

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Emotional Pitfalls of eLearning as a New Business

September 15th, 2011
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Falling into a deep hole

In Using Moodle for Business, I put “lack of objectivity” at the top of Common Mistakes.  As with any new venture, deciding to launch an eLearning site has its risks.  There will be costs, there will need to be a great deal of time invested to make it work, and the revenue stream is never guaranteed.

No matter how excited you are about the unlimited potential of having your content online, you must harness that excitement and write a business case.  This business case must be based on facts and data from market research, financial considerations, and your own self-assessment. It should not be an emotionally-driven document.

This doesn’t mean that you should be dispassionate in the implementation of your plan.  Passion is what makes most businesses succeed.  Even the largest corporations today began as ideas of passionate people, undaunted by potential risks.

Be passionate in the work.  Be objective and calculating in the decision-making.

Another Common Mistake is the lack of a budget – a realistic budget.  I really did have one client tell me her budget was “angel’s wings”.  I’m not really sure how many dollars or euros that is, but I’m pretty sure it meant that she had no budget at all.  For a rare few, that can mean they have unlimited resources.  For most of us, it means that we will need to make some choices, based on what we can afford.  Failure to make those choices in the beginning almost always leads to overall project failure.

Even if you have narrowed your search and have decided on Moodle, it can cost from a few hundred to many thousands of dollars to construct a site.  Know what you must have and know what you can afford!

It is intuitive to most people that a building – factory, store-front, warehouse – will be a large expense for any business moving in.  There will be lease or mortgage payments, utilities, the cost of moving in and setting up.  Equipment and supplies will be needed.

Rarely do I see a sign that reads “FREE WAREHOUSE SPACE.  MOVE IN TODAY!”

But when it comes to eLearning (not just Moodle), we are teased and lured in by the promise of “free hosting”, “free downloads”, “free domains”.  This has led many people to believe that a web presence – unlike a physical presence – is free.  There is nothing to pay for; it’s all free!

As my client Kyle* says, “It doesn’t take much to do it poorly.  It is, in fact, effortless”.

Quality of Your ELearning Site =

Money You Put Into It + Time You Put Into It + Planning You Put Into It

Even if you don’t have much money, you can have a great site.  The better you plan and the more time you put in yourself, the less it will cost.  But again, don’t let your passion drive your budget.  Be realistic about your financial resources and passionate with the time you put into the planning and the building of the content.

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A Few Words About: Online Applications, Free or Not

August 26th, 2011
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A Few Words AboutAs I was writing the two previous posts on online applications, I discovered that one I just learned about was no longer available.  Earlier this summer, I was about to back up my life’s work to an online storage service, when I realized that their pricing had gone from $10/month to $49/month.  Last winter, the Moodle community was stunned by the sudden shut-down of the web meeting service, DimDim.

How can this be?  Why is this happening?

Well, you see, these online applications are typically in business to make money, just like you.  They offer free services as a sort of “free sample”.  If you like it, you’ll buy more.  What happens is that not enough people buy to justify giving away any more samples.  Perhaps the free-sample people take up more time and support resources than the people who pay for their accounts.  Or, maybe the application is so awesome that some bigger company decides it would be a competitive advantage to own that code.  They buy out CoolOnlineEditor.com.  This is great for the college kid who wrote the code, but not so great for those of us who were using his online services.  In some instances, a big, evil company comes along and buys out the really good application just so the rest of us cannot use it. Sad, but true.

For online services such as quick image editing, PDF printing, and screen casts, the worst that can happen is that you’ll have to find another service. That shouldn’t slow you down too much.

If you use a social media service to aggregate your Twitter, Facebook, email, IM, etc…and that’s the only place you store your usernames and passwords, you’ll spend a lot of time recovering that information.  Then you’ll have to spend some time finding and learning another application.  This is annoying, but not too serious.

If the free (or inexpensive) photo gallery (or other document storage) system you use shuts down, this is just a pain in the neck if you have a copy of everything.  If you don’t have a back-up, well, that’s catastrophic. Of course, big name sites (like Kodak and Google) are not as likely to shut down and leave you hanging as WeRCheap4Storage.com, but they do have a right to change their policies.

What is the risk?

Anything and everything online is at risk (although some risks are so low you might as well worry about a meteor strike). With downloaded software (resident on your computer), the worst thing that can happen is that it is no longer supported. Online, any service can:

  • Stop taking registrations
  • Discontinue features
  • Start charging for features that were free or raise prices
  • Disappear altogether (shut down the site) for any number of reasons.  This is the worst because it can be without warning.

The more effort you put into building the content or customizing the online application, the more you stand to lose.  A blog with 100 posts is far more difficult to rebuild than an online gallery of the photos you have duplicates of on your hard drive.  The more you stand to lose, the more you should do to prevent any negative impacts on you.

What can you do?

For any and all of it, back up anything you can.  Keep it stored where you can easily recover it and restore functionality as quickly as possible.

For the more content-rich applications, the ones you depend on heavily, and/or those that will take you a lot of time to set up or customize to your needs, do your homework before investing that time.  Read reviews at CNET, PC Magazine, PCWorld, SourceForge, industry-specific publications, and of course, online searches for specific functionality.  Choose a stable application (one that has good reviews from users and IT experts alike and has been around “a while”) and back up your content regardless of how good they are!

Platforms such as Moodle, Joomla, WordPress, and Drupal are probably here to stay, but is your host?  Even though I know my sites are backed up and protected as much as humanely possible, I still back up the content, copies of which I keep copies on my local drives.  I would never risk a free hosting service unless it was associated with an organization I had plenty of confidence in.

We live in a rapidly changing world, which is both good and bad.  Nowadays, there is such a thing as a “free lunch” – for a time anyway.

The lesson is: don’t put all your eggs in one basket.  The more dependent you are on an application, the more important it is that you a) make sure you have a recovery plan if that application shuts down and b) investigate the options so that your choice of application is based on something other than “it’s free”.

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More Ways to Make Your eLearning GREAT

August 23rd, 2011
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A little creativity goes a long way.

Last month, at the Midwest Moodle Moot, I attended a workshop by Melinda Kraft of Albion College.  “The Moodle Mash – It’s a Web 2.0 Splash” covered many free (or inexpensive) and easy-to-use online applications that you can use to add more connectivity, interaction, and interest to your Moodle courses.  I’m splitting this into two posts:  this one on multi-media and a second one on collaboration and interaction.  Both build on previous posts…if you have time, read them all!

Create your own multi-media for your content. These will make your eLearning GREAT without breaking the budget on production costs.  You don’t have to be an artist, but a  little creativity helps…Here are some of the applications Melinda demonstrated, with my business content take on them.  Warning: some of these examples are, uh, rough around the edges.  I would recommend more polished versions for real courses.

  • GoAnimate.com Create cartoons for memorable lessons.  So much business training is so dry, so boring.  Lighten it up with a cartoon here and there (don’t overdo it) to highlight really critical messages you want students to remember.  Or, use them to offer a mental break after a particularly intense topic. Watch Zeb help Gerry remember the things to look for in a 10 Second Inspection in the Fort Swampy course at BeeLearn.com.
  • Xtranormal is another site that allows you to create animated movies online.  There is also a desktop version.  There is more functionality here than with GoAnimate.com, but you’ll have to pay for everything after the initial test.  Here is my first creation; crude, but not so bad for ten minutes worth of my time.
  • Aviary.com Super easy online image editing.  A picture is worth 1000 words and every eLearning course should contain some!  I have spent hours searching for just the right stock image or trying to adjust an existing image with Photoshop.

    Buzzy Made-over at Aviary.com

    I don’t recommend dressing your logo up like he’s been out on an all-night bender, but you can do it in a few minutes if you choose. You can get a free screen capture/editor as a browser extension, too.  A great time saver when you are building content.

  • Create and edit more than images with AviaryTools. Obtaining a license to use copyrighted material in a commercial project (which applies to eLearning courses used by all business, for profit or not), can be expensive or forbidden.  These online tools are affordable and useful when you want to:
    • Include music in your content.  Create your own score!
    • Add sound effects (including your own voice) to your Engage animations, GoAnimate or Xtranormal videos, or as stand-alone content in your courses.
    • Add comments or otherwise mark-up screen captures and images.
  • Snagit and Jing by TechSmith – Easily create “how-to” videos, narrated slideshows, and other objects to show your students, comment on what they’ve done, and help them collaborate with each other.
  • WidgetBox.com Mix up the way your content is presented by displaying it in a widget (copy the code into any HTML area in your course). Some ideas for displaying content in a widget:
  • BrainPOP was not covered at the Moot; Brent Schlenker tweeted this one about Hurricanes (given the current event of Hurricane Irene threatening the east coast of the US and Canada).  Very, very nice…

Most of these come with widgets and buttons that you can place in your content to direct students to create their own as part of assignments.

Mobile Widgets at WidgetBox.com. This is a fee-based service, but you can try it out for 30 days.  Offer your clients a free app that supports your training content. Even if one already exists, customize your own with your logo and contact information, specific to your training content and expertise:

  • A mobile version of a quick reference like the Pill Identifier or Seafood Watch (above).
  • Things to look for in a 10 Second Inspection; any checklist or guide that would be helpful to people when the job takes them away from their computers.
  • Calendar with important events.  Include your “office hours”, required web meetings, chats, and even assignment due dates.
  • Assignments.  This app could provide details on the assignment, links to resources, quick tip guides.  This is especially helpful if your course requires field work, whether it be in a hospital, a mall, the manufacturing floor, or literally a field.

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More ways to Jazz up Your Moodle Courses with Collaboration and Interaction

August 23rd, 2011
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Jazz up your Moodle coursesBuilding on an earlier post and a Moot workshop presentation by Melinda Kraft of Albion College, here are some ideas for using online applications to stay connected with your students and to encourage them to interact with each other. Make sure you check out the companion post to this one, More Ways to Make Your eLearning GREAT.

WidgetBox.com Add unlimited features to any Moodle course or Front Page– for learning, communicating, or just plain fun. Create an account, design your widget, using one of their many templates or your own, and copy the code into an HTML block in your Moodle course (or front page). Some ideas for using their templates to make your courses more engaging:

  • An RSS feed from your blog (much nicer formatting than the standard Moodle RSS block), a YouTube widget, Twitter updates; you can see examples in the Pluto course at BeeLearn.com.
  • Poll widget – use on the home page to gather demographics about your site visitors; within courses you can use this much like the Moodle Choice activity to gather instant feedback such as “Would you like to see more examples like this one?” or “Who is buried in Grant’s tomb?”
  • Form – use as a sign up form for an event, a newsletter, a free information product, a follow-up call for a quote, a free consultation…View an example in the Fort Swampy course at BeeLearn.com where the form is used to sign up for peer study groups.
  • Countdown – are you holding a webinar or speaking at a conference?  The Countdown widget lets you customize the event name, the countdown display, and a custom message once the event is over.  You can put “Sorry, you missed it, but you can download the presentation here” and put a link. See an example in the Pluto course at BeeLearn.com.

Note that the WidgetBox.com Basic account is free, but has fewer design options than the fee-based Pro account.

Chat, VOIP, and Web meeting clients that add interactivity to any eLearning course:

  • Meebo Put the Meebo Bar on your site to make it easy for both visitors and participants to share with others, connect with you, and even allow affiliate advertisements without negatively affecting the aesthetics or distracting learners.
  • Trillian I am not an online chatter anymore.  Twenty-five years ago I was enthralled with, so I avoid the temptation now.  But if you are, Trillian is the IM client for you, aggregating all of your screen names in one place so you can keep up.
  • For VOIP calls and web meetings, Skype remains a favorite.  There was a Skype activity module (plugin) for Moodle; I’m not sure if it’s working for 2.x or not.  Regardless of that, you can create a customized Skype button and place it in any HTML content area in Moodle.

Use these scheduling applications to connect with your students/clients for coaching sessions, consulting, speaking engagements.  You’re not bogged down by multiple “are you available” emails; you don’t need a personal assistant to schedule for you.  These can be linked or embedded in your Moodle course content and can sync with your Moodle calendar.

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Using Moodle for Business: Moot Presentation

July 30th, 2011
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Here is the presentation I gave at the Midwest Moodle Moot. You can view it online as a flip book (click the image below) and download the PDF from there or from the link at the bottom of this post.

Using Moodle for Business

PDF version only

Using Moodle for Business 6 steps - a printable tip sheetIf you’d like a summary tip sheet of the Six Steps, send me your snail mail address. Or, you can print your own from this PDF.

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A Gathering For Everyone: Midwest Moodle Moot July 20-22

July 16th, 2011
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From absolute beginners to advanced users, everyone is invited! Participants include teachers, trainers, administrators and support staff from a wide range of education, business, non-profit and service sectors. Learn more…

My presentation Using Moodle for Business will be available for download on July 25.

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A Few Words About: Using Moodle Outcomes

June 19th, 2011
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A Few Words AboutA question was recently posed regarding certification for Lean Six Sigma.  There is no governing body and no standard test.  Many companies, including my own, offer certification. How can that be?  How can someone be certified to do something when there is no standard against which to measure that person’s competence?

The irony here is that Lean Six Sigma is all about measurements, standards, and processes.  As a professional in the field for more than two decades, I know the importance of operational definitions, standard processes, and calibrated measurements.  This is no less important when it comes to certifying experts.

Whether your profession has standards for certification or not, you can – and should – use reliable and valid instruments for measuring competencies and skills.  The scales that you use to grade need to be applied consistently. You also need to ensure that what you’re measuring is correlated to competency in that job; i.e.: a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

Assuming that you’re training for certification, not just administering tests, a great way to design and validate your certification process is to use Moodle Outcomes.

Outcomes are not simply pass/fail grades.  Grades of tests and assignments, along with other demonstrations of competence, are used to determine the outcomes based on a set of evaluation criteria.  This set of criteria is known as a rubric.

Outcomes – and rubrics – can become quite complicated and they aren’t something you can apply directly from one curriculum to another.  You can, however, follow good examples, such as this one at Moodle.org.

Before you can create your own rubric, you need to:

  1. Determine the competencies required for the certification or diploma you are awarding.
  2. Design the training that will teach these required skills.
  3. Design the testing that will reliably measure the competencies gained by your training.

Once you have defined the set of criteria for each outcome, then you can:

  1. Deliver the training and testing (tests, written assignments, hands-on assignments…)
  2. Evaluate each student against those criteria.

Stay tuned to this blog and Buzzy’s Beehive for many more posts on rating scales, grades, good question writing, and how to implement them in Moodle.

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